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By Megan Smiley, Oct 26 2018 10:19AM


British Summer Time officially ends this weekend and although that means you gain an extra hour in bed it also means shorter days, as well as cold and wet weather (especially in Glasgow), are well and truly here. So the heating is now on timed rather than a quick blast when it feels a little chilly, you’ve dug out that oversized cosy jumper/cardi that has seen better days but still does the job of keeping you feel warm and safe on the sofa, you’ve switched your meals from salads to soups and grilled fish and meats to warming one pot wonders. In other words you’ve gone into hibernation mode!


There are some other changes that often occur in this autumn hibernation transition, one being people become less active. Now I understand it is harder to get out of bed when it’s still dark, and it’s less appealing to go and run around, cycle, walk or whatever when it’s dark and cold. And there isn’t that summer motivation of wanting to look good in skimpier clothes/swimwear.


But that mindset just reflects the short-term view people take on health and fitness. As I always say, there aren’t any quick fixes or magic answers. Being fit and healthy is a long term commitment, a way of life that should be intertwined in your existence. It shouldn’t be because of a holiday, birthday or wedding, those things can be a great catalyst to start you off but you should want to find a routine that you can continue forever. Obviously there will be times when you need to adapt your routine and then times things will get dropped a little, but generally it’s about finding healthy habits that become second nature AND you enjoy (on some level)!


If you let those healthy habits and exercise routines you’ve built, drop off over autumn and winter it means, if you do start them up again, say in next spring, it’s going to be hard and take a while to get back into your routine and reach the levels you were at when you stopped.


So it’s about slightly adapting, working out how you can continue your healthy habits without having to go running in the rain if that’s something you don’t like. It’s amazing how much you can do inside, so even if you only have a small space in your home, you could still do a morning workout there. Also, think outside the box for spaces you could use (I used to train a client in the underground car park in the depth of winter), and things you could do. There are the obvious options of gyms and classes but maybe there’s some indoor activity you’ve always fancied but haven’t had the time to try, it could be indoor climbing, swimming or dance lessons.


Finally, as I touched on above, there is a tendency to move to a more wintry diet but it isn’t a bad thing. There are plenty of hearty and wholesome winter foods that are healthy. If you don’t fancy a cold salad, you could cook it instead – I love oven roasted little gem lettuce and cherry tomatoes. Warming food doesn’t have to be all about pies and puddings!


So what I’m saying is don’t just throw the towel in on your healthy habits as the days draw in. Keep being active and eating healthily but adapt it as necessary. Or if you’re wanting to get fit and healthy don’t think, there’s no point starting now, I’ll wait till spring. So carry on, or start now, and get your body fit, healthy and strong not just for summer but for life!





By Megan Smiley, Jun 19 2018 04:34PM


Are you a flexitarian or thinking about being one? Flexitarianism is when you mainly follow a plant-based diet but eat a bit of everything at times.


It’s definitely something I think I could, or rather would, be willing to do. I have many friends who are pescatarians, vegetarians or vegans but the fact that I’m a big believer in variety in your diet for both health reasons and because I love eating lots of different types of food, I’ve struggled to entertain the idea of any of them. That is apart from one week as a young teenager I declared to my carnivorous family that I was going to be a veggie after watching an animal welfare video at school. As I said, it lasted a week. It’s not that I eat lots of meat, I have at least one meat-free day a week, my lunches are pretty much always vegetarian but giving up dairy, meat and in particular fish and seafood would be a struggle for me, especially when eating out and when my husband is involved (he’s your typical omnivore who thinks meat is that the focal point of a meal). So flexitarianism could be the solution.


I’m not the only one, as flexitarianism is becoming pretty popular for a combination of reasons including: environmental, ethical and health. Reducing the amount of meat and dairy consumption and therefore production is unquestionably beneficial for the environment and reduces an individual’s carbon footprint. Depending on where you source your non plant-based food from, the ethics and morals of production and distribution of these products are often pretty questionable, particularly in mainstream, low-cost products. Then the health benefits, and this is the bit I get a little stuck at as I’m completely on-board with the environmental and ethical reasons, but does cutting back on massive food groups -meat, fish, dairy – really make you healthier?


I guess the health issue is a little bit of a grey area as it depends on the individual’s starting point. Are you eating lots of meat especially processed meat and too much dairy? Do you hardly eat any fruit, veg and legumes? If so cutting back on the processed meat and increasing plant-based food is going to be good for you. But cutting back on all meat, fish and dairy means you’re going to be reducing important macronutrients (mainly protein and fats) and micronutrients (minerals and vitamins). So ensuring you get all the nutrition your body needs to operate at it’s best becomes more difficult and you need a greater level of understanding of food and functions that different nutrients support. I am not saying you can’t be a healthy flexie, pescie, veggie or vegan but you have to put in a little more effort to get a balanced diet. And this is at a time when the UK population is struggling with balancing the amount of food they eat vs the amount of food their bodies actually need, hence approximately a third of the population being overweight and a third being obese. So I’m sure you can see why I’m not all that confident that everyone is going to manage to achieve a balanced diet ensuring all important nutrients are included!


As with all diets, a little knowledge can be dangerous, and I feel flexitarianism could lead to people becoming nutrient deficient in many areas, therefore I think once again (all my blog posts seem to finish like this!) it’s about getting that balance right. So before you dive into a new diet have a think about how you will ensure you get enough of those important nutrients you’re cutting back on – where will your protein, omega 3 fatty acids, iron, calcium, zinc, iodine, vitamin B12 amongst many others come from? How much is sensible to cut back? Using a food tracker like My Fitness Pal will give you a break down of the nutrients in your food and is a good way of ensuring you’re getting the right amounts.


As I see it, flexitarianism is on a spectrum and you can choose where you put yourself on it, be it just one meat-free day a week or being a vegan apart from the very odd occasion, and that’s what I like about it – it’s flexible for you and your life. For me, I think I will try and ‘flex it up’ a little more for the environmental and ethical reasons, but for health (and selfish reasons- I like a variety of food too much) I’ll still make sure I get enough meat, fish and dairy for what is right for me. So choose what’s right for you and give it a go, but remember to think before you flex!