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By Megan Smiley, Oct 26 2018 10:19AM


British Summer Time officially ends this weekend and although that means you gain an extra hour in bed it also means shorter days, as well as cold and wet weather (especially in Glasgow), are well and truly here. So the heating is now on timed rather than a quick blast when it feels a little chilly, you’ve dug out that oversized cosy jumper/cardi that has seen better days but still does the job of keeping you feel warm and safe on the sofa, you’ve switched your meals from salads to soups and grilled fish and meats to warming one pot wonders. In other words you’ve gone into hibernation mode!


There are some other changes that often occur in this autumn hibernation transition, one being people become less active. Now I understand it is harder to get out of bed when it’s still dark, and it’s less appealing to go and run around, cycle, walk or whatever when it’s dark and cold. And there isn’t that summer motivation of wanting to look good in skimpier clothes/swimwear.


But that mindset just reflects the short-term view people take on health and fitness. As I always say, there aren’t any quick fixes or magic answers. Being fit and healthy is a long term commitment, a way of life that should be intertwined in your existence. It shouldn’t be because of a holiday, birthday or wedding, those things can be a great catalyst to start you off but you should want to find a routine that you can continue forever. Obviously there will be times when you need to adapt your routine and then times things will get dropped a little, but generally it’s about finding healthy habits that become second nature AND you enjoy (on some level)!


If you let those healthy habits and exercise routines you’ve built, drop off over autumn and winter it means, if you do start them up again, say in next spring, it’s going to be hard and take a while to get back into your routine and reach the levels you were at when you stopped.


So it’s about slightly adapting, working out how you can continue your healthy habits without having to go running in the rain if that’s something you don’t like. It’s amazing how much you can do inside, so even if you only have a small space in your home, you could still do a morning workout there. Also, think outside the box for spaces you could use (I used to train a client in the underground car park in the depth of winter), and things you could do. There are the obvious options of gyms and classes but maybe there’s some indoor activity you’ve always fancied but haven’t had the time to try, it could be indoor climbing, swimming or dance lessons.


Finally, as I touched on above, there is a tendency to move to a more wintry diet but it isn’t a bad thing. There are plenty of hearty and wholesome winter foods that are healthy. If you don’t fancy a cold salad, you could cook it instead – I love oven roasted little gem lettuce and cherry tomatoes. Warming food doesn’t have to be all about pies and puddings!


So what I’m saying is don’t just throw the towel in on your healthy habits as the days draw in. Keep being active and eating healthily but adapt it as necessary. Or if you’re wanting to get fit and healthy don’t think, there’s no point starting now, I’ll wait till spring. So carry on, or start now, and get your body fit, healthy and strong not just for summer but for life!





By Megan Smiley, Sep 10 2015 08:48AM

As the days get shorter and the weather starts to feel more wintery, I always feel a pang of sadness to be saying goodbye to summer (not that it felt much like summer over the past six weeks!).


There are many reasons for this: I am a sun worshipper; I could spend hours lying in the sun soaking up the rays, and I feel the cold. So the fact I work outside in parks all day means I really notice the change. Plus on a more practical side the shorter days mean there are fewer hours in the day I can train people. And getting up when it's still pitch black, makes those 5.30am mornings that bit harder!


However, once I’m over that initial sorrow, I start to get excited about what the coming seasons have to offer. This might sound like a complete contradiction to what I just said above, but autumn is actually my favourite season. There is less of an expectation for good weather therefore less room for disappointment, and the colours are magical. Trees become things of real beauty, layers of leaves become glossy carpets and on those clear days with the sun sitting low in the sky, long slender shadows make everything look stunning.


Also, in summer the parks are full of picnickers and 'fair weather' park goers, but as the days get colder the parks get emptier, with only your hardcore people made up of fellow exercisers, dog walkers and a few random others. This creates a more peaceful (and fulfilling – I'm out in the cold when most others are sitting indoors) environment to be in.


Finally, with autumn follows winter, and those who know me, know how much I love all the festivities around Christmas, and then a cheeky ski trip in the New Year makes a very positive start to the year!


Basically, I love seasons and the change in nature, activities and people's behaviour you see throughout the year, and I would hate to live somewhere where it gets dark at the same time all year round and where you don't need a winter coat. So if you do hear me moaning about being cold, tell me to be quiet as you now know I secretly like it!